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Sepia Sprockets

Following on from my post on stand development in Rodinal a few days ago, this seems as good an opportunity as any to write about another film for which I used this process, along with some digital trickery to create some exciting hybrid images.

The editing process

Working in a hybrid digital and analogue workflow to full effect often makes use of a number of little editing tricks. you can do some of this in the scanner and some in Photoshop depending on what you are trying to do.

Scanning

Scanning 35mm film with the sprockets can present a few issues. Lomography create the DigitaLIZA device which claims to be able to hold film flat to scan the full area, but with a bit of tweaking the 120 mask on the Epson works fine. Just line the film up with the hinged edge and trap the ends under the mask. If necessary a tiny bit of tape on the end can help. The film may bow up a bit, but with photos through a plastic lens is that really going to make much difference?

I scanned these images as is. That is to say while I made certain choices for settings I just scanned them as a raw file, aiming to do all the adjustments in photoshop later. I used a medium unsharp mask setting, and selected Digital Ice dust removal (have a look in my glossary if you are not sure what these terms mean). I also selected colour negative as the main setting – this setting has some effect on the way that Epson Scan colour corrects if this is performed at the scanning stage, but for now it just provides me with a inverted (positive) image with no changes. Because I am not correcting in the software I can leave a fair border around the portion of the scan I want.

Screenshot of scanning software
Scanning Window

Into Photoshop

Now it’s time to open the scanned image in Photoshop. Continue Reading “Sepia Sprockets”